Abigail Sullivan Moore

 
 

Abby on Better Connecticut

 
 

WHAT THEY'RE SAYING

As a parent of two soon to be college students, I found Abby’s seminar based on her book The iConnected Parent,  to be very timely, informative and thought provoking!  The “connection” and communication between parent and child is always a topic of concern and discussion. Ms. Moore’s research and presentation highlights technology’s effect on our interpersonal  communication methods, frequency and the possible positive and negative consequences of  the iConnected world we live in. --Lorraine G. Marchetti

To Book Abigail for a Speaking Engagement Contact Simon and Schuster Speakers Bureau: 

1-866-248-3049
info@simonspeakers.com, 
www.simonspeakers.com

• Or contact Abigail directly at 860-233-8878 or via the Contact page.

Bio

Abigail Sullivan Moore is a frequent contributor to the New York Times, writing about children and educational issues, especially college students. Her recent stories in the Times’ Education Life section include the trend of long-distance romances among college students in the Jan. 4 issue; her Nov. 7 story revealed SAT and ACT officials getting tougher on granting accommodations to students with ADHD and learning disabilities; her July 25 stories covered how college students are increasingly unable to  resolve ordinary conflicts with their roommates and how roommates influence each other.

 

Her work has been featured in The New York Times Practical Guide to Practically Everything. She has appeared on numerous NPR shows and recently spoke on the transition to college for students with mental health issues at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists.

 

A former staff writer for The Hartford Courant, Ms. Moore also worked in the corporate sector, serving as a spokesperson for The Travelers and CIGNA Corp. She holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and a M.S. in journalism from Northwestern University. A parent of two adolescents—one a college freshmen—she faces her own iConnected challenges daily.

Abigail Sullivan Moore