Abigail Sullivan Moore

 
 

Abby on Better Connecticut

 
 

What They're Saying

"Abby's engaging, intelligent, and balanced presentation on this timely issue was well received by students, faculty, and parents and spurred a great deal of conversation about health relationships and quality communication."

Julia Eells, Head of School, Lincoln School, Providence, RI                        

Abby's talk to KO parents and the community was engaging, entertaining, humorous, very enlightening and offered practical suggestions. It provoked a great conversation among the parents. Parents left the workshop with more knowledge and tools on how to strike a balance between staying in touch with their kids and giving them enough room to become independent."

 Ronit Shoham, Parent Association, Kingswood-Oxford School, West Hartford, CT

To Book Abigail for a Speaking Engagement Contact Simon and Schuster Speakers Bureau: 

1-866-248-3049
info@simonspeakers.com, 
www.simonspeakers.com

• Or contact Abigail directly at 860-233-8878 or via the Contact page.

Published Works

Abigail Sullivan Moore has written extensively for the New York Times. Below, a sampling of articles she's written related to students and their parents:

 

This Is Your Brain on Drugs (Oct 29, 2014) The gray matter of the nucleus accumbens, the walnut-shaped pleasure center of the brain, was glowing like a flame, showing a notable increase in density. “It could mean that there’s some sort of drug learning taking place,” speculated Jodi Gilman, at her computer screen at the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Center for Addiction Medicine. Read more...

 

Legally High at a Colorado Campus (Oct 29, 2014) n an apartment complex just outside the western edge of the University of Colorado’s flagship campus, a 22-year-old psychology major named Zach has just leaned over an expensive oil rig — a twisting glass tube that he will use to smoke shatter, a hash oil concentrate. Once he lights up, his high will be rapid and intense. Zach spends hundreds of dollars on smoking devices. But he has a side income. Read more...

 

Pledge Prep (July 16, 2012) MARGARET KING of Birmingham, Ala.,was at a loss about how to help her older daughter prepare to rush at the University of Virginia. In the South, where sororities have long been a momentous rite of passage, the road to sisterhood is long and not so clearly marked.Read more...

 

A Bridge to Recovery on Campus (January 22, 2012) In their undergrad uniforms of fleece and sweats, a clutch of Rutgers students gathered on the worn red couches of their dorm’s common room and told their stories. A good-looking, fun-loving 23-year-old Read more...

 

A Little Help From Friends (April 17, 2011): Dan Sullivan, a junior at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, notices the warning signs now, even during finals when most everyone seems stressed. Read more...

 

A Long-Distance Affair (January 7, 2011): CHANTELLE WELP and Colin Sorensen grew up together in Greeley, Colo. They despised each other in middle school, became friends junior year of high school and, in a twist of romantic irony, turned into a couple over Christmas vacation of their senior year — just weeks before they learned of their very different college destinies. Read more...

 

Accommodations Angst (November 4, 2010): EXTRA time. More breaks. A small, quiet room. Seeking such accommodations on entrance exams can be a journey of angst for students with learning disabilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. A new set of federal regulations, published in September and effective in March, could smooth the path. Read more...

 

A Failure to Communicate Face-to-Face (July 22, 2010): SINCE the very first bunk bed, roommates have annoyed each other. They leave their clothes all over the floor; they host overnight guests unannounced. Big deal. You tell them to pick up their stuff; you work out a “sexile” schedule. But housing officials say that lately they are noticing something different: students seem to lack the will, and skill, to address these ordinary conflicts. Read more...

 

The Science of Roommates  (July 23, 2010): FIRST-YEAR roommates matter. Though they may go their separate ways sophomore year, their reach can ripple throughout the college years and after.

“No one forgets their college roommate,” says Allison Ryan, an associate professor in educational psychology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, who studies social and academic development during adolescence. Busy building their own identities, first-year students are especially impressionable to a roommate’s sway. Read more...

 

Students on the Spectrum (November 5, 2006): VALERIE KAPLAN has an aptitude for math, and scored a perfect 1600 on her SAT. When her high school classmates applauded the announcement at lunch, she was pleased. But less obvious signals — a raised eyebrow or impatient glance at a watch — elude her. In an advanced course at Carnegie Mellon called “Building Virtual Worlds,” that problem caused classmates to sideline her in group projects. And during a critical meeting to win approval for her customized major, electronic art, she intently circled the freckles on her arm with a marker.  Read more....

 

Just Say No - No Need Here (January 16, 2005 ): LIKE many students enjoying the newfound freedom of college, the young man accelerated the drinking he had begun at prep school. ''You go nuts,'' he explains, looking back, seemingly both amazed and disgusted. At 6-foot-1 and 215 pounds, he was able to put away up to 18 beers a night at weekend parties. ''It was crazy,'' says the student, now a junior at Fairfield University, adding that afterward, ''I'd feel like death all day.'' Read more...

 

How To: Identify a Gifted Child (July 31, 2005):  DISCERNING gifted children, long an imperfect science, is even tougher in today's label-prone culture. James T. Webb, a clinical psychologist and author of ''Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnosis of Gifted Children and Adults,'' explains what can go wrong. Read more...

 

If at First You Don't Succeed Enough ( November 6, 2005 ): THIS fall at Avon Old Farms, a prestigious boys' prep school in Connecticut, 16 percent of the freshmen are transfer students doing the year for the second time. They include three straight-A students, says Brendon Welker, its director of admissions.

Repeating the year - in some circles known as a "refresh" or "resoph," depending on the grade - has become an increasingly accepted practice at private schools in the Northeast, especially boarding schools.  Read more...

 

The LAX Track (November 6, 2005): IT is a blistering week in July, and thousands of girls and scores of college coaches pour into Love Point Park in Stevensville, Md., for the annual All Star Express. The tournament, a four-day extravaganza of athleticism and ambition, is billed as the recruiting event of the year for women's college lacrosse (lax, for short). Read more...

 

Before College, A Taste of Real World (February 29, 2004): ''IT'S incredible. It's fabulous. It's stressful, and some days I just want to tear my hair out. Why can't I save every one?'' said Sonia Pascal, who at 18 recently deferred admission to the Ivy League to tutor sixth-graders in the Bronx.

Ms. Pascal is enrolled for a 10-month stint in City Year, a nonprofit, national service program for young people. Graduating seventh in Norwich Free Academy's 2003 class, Ms. Pascal saw her deferment as a precious chance to ''develop my humanity,'' while still attending the University of Pennsylvania next fall, and then, perhaps, law school. Read more...

 

Kindergarten Can Wait  (September 28, 2003 ): KINDERGARTEN and the age of 5 have long gone together like, well, peanut butter and jelly. But not everywhere. In some towns, almost a fifth of the children eligible to start school aren't. While many parents said their children may not be mature enough or academically ready, school administrators said there is sometimes another, more disturbing, reason: an early strategy to get the child into a better college. Read more...

Abigail Sullivan Moore